donate link to home page link to home page about the disease Save the Tasmanian devil. Devil Facial Tumouir Disease threatens the existence of this internationally-recognised icon. In some areas more than 90% of the Tasmanian devil population has been wiped out.

Field Work Goes Hi-Tech

Thanks to a generous donation from the Wellington Zoo Conservation Fund, the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP) has been able to increase efficiency of field staff with the purchase of new tablets and the development of purpose specific software. 
 
STDP wildlife biologist Phil Wise said the new tablets allow STDP staff to enter trapping data and devil identification photos directly into the newly developed software which can then be viewed by other program staff in real time. 

“With field staff working in often remote locations, data is usually not available to the rest of the program staff until the field team return to base so being able to access the information as it is being captured is going to be a huge advantage for all of us” Phil said.

“With thanks to Dr Carolyn Hogg at the University of Sydney, the software has been designed to make data entry simple for users and ensures all necessary data is recorded. At the completion of the monitoring trip all data is then downloaded as a spreadsheet which greatly reduces post trip data entry which is often quite time consuming”. 

The new tablets and software were used for the first time last month as part of the Wild Devil Recovery Project and have been given a big thumbs up by field staff, even those who consider themselves technology challenged!
Save the Tasmanian Devil Program's Phil Wise and University of Sydney Dr Carolyn Hogg 'showing' Aoraki how the new technology works.    Dr Carolyn Hogg from the University of Sydney and Phil Wise from the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program using the new technology to capture trapping data and devil identification photos. 
Save the Tasmanian Devil Program's Phil Wise and University of Dr Carolyn Hogg from the University of Sydney and Phil Wise from the Save
Sydney Dr Carolyn Hogg 'showing' Aoraki how the new technology the Tasmanian Devil Program using the new technology to capture trapping 
works. data and devil identification photos.
  
 The new tablets and software have been purchased thanks to a donation from the Wellington Zoo Conservation Fund.   Save the Tasmanian Devil Program's wildlife biologists Phil Wise and Drew Lee learning how to use the new technology
The new tablets and software have been purchased thanks to a donation from Save the Tasmanian Devil Program's wildlife biologists Phil Wise and Drew Lee 
the Wellington Zoo Conservation Fund. learning how to use the new technology.