donate link to home page link to home page about the disease Save the Tasmanian devil. Devil Facial Tumouir Disease threatens the existence of this internationally-recognised icon. In some areas more than 90% of the Tasmanian devil population has been wiped out.

A Timely Donation thanks to Wildcare Inc and Woolnorth Wind Farms

$20,000 worth of virtual fencing has been purchased by the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program thanks to a $10,000 grant from the Wildcare Saffire Devil Fund and a $10,000 donation from Woolnorth Wind Farms.
The Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP) is very excited to announce that Wildcare Inc. and Woolnorth Wind Farms have partnered with the program to purchase virtual fence units designed to deter Tasmanian devils and other native animals from crossing roads.
 
$20,000 worth of virtual fencing has been purchased by the STDP thanks to a $10,000 grant from the Wildcare Saffire Devil Fund and a $10,000 donation from Woolnorth Wind Farms.

STDP Program Manager Dr David Pemberton says virtual fences are a key part of roadkill mitigation strategy and the donation is timely so soon after the release of 33 devils into the wukalina/Mount William area late last month as part of the program’s Wild Devil Recovery Project.

“Virtual fence devices are an active electronic protection system that warns animals that a vehicle is on a road,” Dr Pemberton said. “The devices are activated by approaching headlights, which causes them to emit sound and light stimuli and alert animals to oncoming traffic”

“Thanks to this generous grant and donation, virtual fence units are being installed in roadkill hotspots around the wukalina/ Mount William release area,” Dr Pemberton said. “It will allow us to respond to hotspots more quickly and efficiently – not only for this release but also future projects.”

Robert Barbour, Health, Safety and Environment Advisor from Woolnorth Wind Farms says the research and management activities of the STDP are highly valuable for the iconic species. 

“While our wind farm activities have little impact on devils, our business feels strongly about the conservation of Tasmania’s unique flora and fauna. All of our wind farm properties are managed with large areas set aside for conservation,” Mr Barbour said.

“The Musselroe Wind Farm is positioned in one of the worst hit areas for Devil Facial Tumour Disease in Tasmania, and so an opportunity exists to extend a helpful hand and support the program with our donation for a roadside virtual fencing system.”

Co-Chair of Wildcare Inc. Peter F Williams says Wildcare supports natural and cultural heritage conservation and reserve management throughout Tasmania, through volunteer work and donations.

“We are particularly pleased with being able to grant considerable amounts of money for Tasmanian devil conservation, including today’s $10,000 for the purchase of virtual fencing units,” Mr Williams said.

“This money comes from donors large and small and we encourage people to give to the Wildcare Wild Saffire Devil Fund so that we can continue to support Devil conservation activities.”

In order for the STDP to measure the success of the recent Wild Devil Recovery releases and to provide as many new devils to the incumbent population as possible, it is important to maximise the number of released animals that survive, especially past the initial vulnerable period of eight weeks.

The STDP is very thankful for the support from both Wildcare Inc. and Woolnorth Wind Farms as it allows us to give the released devils, and surrounding wildlife, the best chance of survival.
 
Robert Barbour from Woolnorth Wind Farms, Dr David Pemberton from the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program and Sally Sallier from Wildcare Inc being interviewed on radio.    Dr David Pemberton from the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program with Robert Barbour from Woolnorth Wind Farms and Sally Sallier from Wildcare Inc.

Robert Barbour from Woolnorth Wind Farms, Dr David Dr David Pemberton from the Save the Tasmanian Devil  

Pemberton from the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program Program with Robert Barbour from Woolnorth Wind Farms 

and Sally Sallier from Wildcare Inc being interviewed on and Sally Sallier from Wildcare Inc.

radio.